On July 5, 2005, the Nationals beat the Mets 3-2 to bring their record in one-run games that year to an incredible 23-7. At the time, there was a lot of praise heaped on Frank Robinson's late-game strategy, the Nationals' bullpen, and the team's overall ability to "find ways to win"--a lot of the same points you're hearing now.By the end of the season, the team's record in one-run games was 30-31.What happened? Did the Nationals' bullpen fall apart? Not really. Chad Cordero's ERA rose from 1.13 in the first half to 3.04 in the second, but that's hardly cratering. Gary Majewski's got better, falling from 3.21 to 2.66. Luis Ayala: 3.06 to 1.15. Hector Carrasco: 2.43 to 1.80.Presumably the Nationals didn't suddenly lose the intangible "scrappy winner" quality we heard so much about. Frank...

Read more at the source of this article